This Week in OpenNMS, Friday January 9th

The holidays are over, the hangovers have been recovered from, and in the meantime, a flurry of activity has been happening in the OpenNMS world. It’s time for another This Week in OpenNMS!

Project Updates

Stable: 1.6.2 Coming

The goal is to release version 1.6.2 next week. There have been a number of bugs fixed (and a few small features added) since 1.6.2.

Trunk: Provisioning

Work continues on the new provisioning code at a frantic pace. We’re not yet at a milestone where people can use it, but lots of pieces are coming together.

Trunk: Acknowledgement Daemon

Dave has begun work on Ackd, the OpenNMS acknowledgement daemon. This will allow API and user-interactive access to acknowledging alarms. The goal is to be able to acknowledge alarms through jabber, email, etc. upon receiving a notification of an issue.

Trunk: Alarm Daemon

Dave also worked on Alarmd, a daemon for managing persistence of alarms to improve event persistence performance and reduce delay in forwarding events to listeners.

This immediately began discussions with a large Telco in Europe about their contributing a 3GPP compliant . . . → Read More: This Week in OpenNMS, Friday January 9th

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Stats Junkie

If there’s one thing I know about people who are involved in network management, it’s that they’re stats junkies. Case in point. (Hah, I mean, how cool is it to poll the weather in OpenNMS…) I put that to the test in the last week, most definitely.

I got slashdotted (and ars technica’d, and dugg) a few days ago, and despite being under the weather, it fired me up to do 2 things.

First of all, it got me excited about working on KDE more. I had a great time at the KDE 4.0 release event and for the first time got strong feedback from KDE folks on what I’ve been working on. I got a little bit of that at aKademy but I also still felt quite a bit like the outsider there. This time around there were a number of people who gave me . . . → Read More: Stats Junkie

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KDE/X11 3.2.0

Just a quick update, the KDE builds have been going well, I’ve been doing a bunch of cleanup on the info files, and making scripts to make it easier to manage 10.2-gcc3.3 and 10.3 concurrently (I actually generate the info files from a “common” set.) I’ll probably be all finished up this weekend, and will be ready for a release along with the source, if things continue as they are. (yay)

And so, I’ll leave you with this:

<RangerRick> now I know… uhh… a mac address <Sortova> sshh <Sortova> Everyone will want one

[Update:] Made more progress over the weekend, all that’s left to do is make sure upgrading over the previous binaries works, and clean up some new dependencies, and I’m set. I also think I’ve fixed Qt so it works better with qmake projects.

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Thought you could trick me?

* RangerRick sees the slashdot headline “NASCAR Coursebuilders, Drivers Consult Videogame Version” and wonders how much consulting there can be on figuring out new innovative ways to make an oval. <RangerRick> just don’t tell anyone from north carolina I said that, they’ll kick me out of the state <drm> shhhh <bbraun> RangerRick: you don’t have a mullet, do you? <RangerRick> nope <bbraun> do you have a mailbox as a hood scoop on your car? <RangerRick> haha, nope. <bbraun> what are you doing in north carolina then? <RangerRick> irc’ing <RangerRick> same as drm <drm> you like NC barbeque, RangerRick? <RangerRick> which part of NC? hah! I at least know that’s a trick question.

They take their bar-be-que pretty seriously around here. Just don’t let it get out that I think NASCAR is stupid. 😉

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Yes, We Really Are In The Matrix

<TheWookie> I’m sitting here compiling stuff, fink is updating, i’m running nmap, and writing code in vim. A guy walks in, looks at my screen, and says “Can you actually understand that?” “Yeah” “Holy shit, it’s like the matrix or something!”

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Back on #trax, Like a Junkie Off the Wagon

<leviagpr> dear query, <leviagpr> why are you so slow 🙁 <leviagpr> please answer, <leviagpr> leviagpr -!- zsazs is now known as query <@query> it’s because you’ve run me on MICRO$OFT $QL $ERVER <@query> love, <@query> query <leviagpr> query loves me!!!

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Do not meddle in the affairs of Source Forge…

…for they are subtle, and quick to anger.

<Sortova> http://sourceforge.net/…_id=1&atid=200001 <Sortova> Got it back <Sortova> I must promise not to be bad again <Sortova> I guess they don’t want anyone monitoring them … cause I have 81000 freaking lost service events on their servers (grin)

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Now I know what DiskWarrior is REALLY for…

<jkh_> fenestro: I’d say it’s all pretty easy to summarize <jkh_> fenestro: warrior: “One who is engaged aggressively or energetically in an activity, cause, or conflict: One engaged in acts of war or destruction” <jkh_> fenestro: disk: “Where you keep your data” <jkh_> hence “diskwarrior: A utility engaged in aggressively destroying your data” <jkh_> what more is there to say?

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Watch Out for Squatting dlcompat’s

<pogma> I figured putting cleanup code woulf be safe, exit(3) would call my cleanup function installed with atexit(3) and nothing would call dl* functions after that (hey! we are in exit), but on occasion c++ static destructors can get called after the cleanup code, and they might call a dl* function <pogma> then dlcompat squats on my head and does a big poop

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David Leimbach on the Opteron Architecture

<Leimy> its not really a “bus” anymore I guess…. its a bit confusing <Leimy> like I said… I want to read more about it 🙂 <Leimy> it might be a short bus

heh

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